clarify validity for prtially initialized local variables
authorRalf Jung <post@ralfj.de>
Thu, 23 Aug 2018 10:34:29 +0000 (12:34 +0200)
committerRalf Jung <post@ralfj.de>
Thu, 23 Aug 2018 10:34:29 +0000 (12:34 +0200)
ralf/_posts/2018-08-22-two-kinds-of-invariants.md

index 2e4ff31..c54a010 100644 (file)
@@ -108,10 +108,11 @@ That is where safe code should be able to rely on safety, so that it can interac
 
 This is in strong contrast to validity, which must *always* hold.
 Layout optimizations and LLVM's attributes are in effect throughout unsafe code, so it is never okay to ever have invalid data.
+(With the sole restriction of data which *the compiler statically knows is not initialized*: If you write `let b: bool;`, that data in `b` is kept inaccessible *even to unsafe code*, and it does not have to satisfy any invariant. This works because the compiler knows about `b` not being initialized.)
 
 > *Unsafe code must always uphold validity invariants.*
 
-So we clearly cannot just pick the same invariant for both.
+So we clearly cannot just pick the same invariant for both, or else it would be impossible to write `Vec`.
 We *might* want to just ignore user-defined invariants when it comes to validity, but I think that would be ill-advised.
 
 First of all, validity is part of the definition of undefined behavior.