link to my UB post
authorRalf Jung <post@ralfj.de>
Mon, 15 Jul 2019 12:58:59 +0000 (14:58 +0200)
committerRalf Jung <post@ralfj.de>
Mon, 15 Jul 2019 12:58:59 +0000 (14:58 +0200)
ralf/_posts/2019-07-14-uninit.md

index e2089cb..c8f2d9d 100644 (file)
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@ How is this possible?
 The answer is that, in the "abstract machine" that is used to specify the behavior of our program, every byte in memory cannot just have a value in `0..256` (this is Rust/Ruby syntax for a left-inclusive right-exclusive range), it can also be "uninitialized".
 Memory *remembers* if you initialized it.
 The `x` that is passed to `always_return_true` is *not* the 8-bit representation of some number, it is an uninitialized byte.
-Performing operations such as comparison on uninitialized bytes is undefined behavior.
+Performing operations such as comparison on uninitialized bytes is [undefined behavior]({% post_url 2017-07-14-undefined-behavior %}).
 As a consequence, our program has undefined behavior, so we should not be surprised that it acts "weirdly".
 
 Of course, there is a reason for this undefined behavior.